Aaron Beck

October 31, 2009

Aaron Beck (1921-) combined Rogers and Freud to create Cognitive Therapy.  [Read more]

Lewis Terman

October 31, 2009

Born on a farm in central Indiana (12th of 14 kids), Lewis M. Terman (1877-1956) began his education in a 1-room school and ended with a Ph.D. from Clark University. Suffering from tuberculosis, he took became a school principal in San Bernadino, California (for its warm climate) and taught at a local teacher’s college (which later became UCLA). [Read more]

Solon

October 31, 2009

About the time King Nebuchadnezzar II built the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Solon (630-560BC) introduced democracy to Athens. Using a four-tier hierarchical structure based on wealth, each class of citizen had certain privileges and responsibilities. [Read more]

Plato

October 31, 2009

A student of Socrates, Plato (427-347 BC) introduced a dualistic view of the world. Ideas are separate from matter and exist in their own world; matter is an imperfect copy of that reality.  [Read more]

Plotinus

October 31, 2009

Plotinus (205-270) was the founder of Neoplatonism. He didn’t just revive Plato’s ideas; he revamped them and combined them with those of Pythagorus. The result is a dualism that contends that the soul and body are completely separate. [Read more]

Pythagoras

October 31, 2009

Pythagoras (582-500 BC) is best known for the Pythagorean theorem but he viewed mathematics as a religious-philosophical system. He believed in harmony of the universe, orderliness of thought, and transmigration of souls. [Read more]

Thales

October 31, 2009

Although his accomplishment may be apocryphal, Thales (645-625 BC) is credited with stating mathematics first theorems, founding physics by searching for a physis (primary element), and predicting the eclipse of the sun of May 28, 585 BC. [Read more]

Zeno

October 31, 2009

It’s important to keep your Zeno’s clear. There’s Zeno of Elea and Zeno of Citium. Zeno of Elea (Italy) is the one who came up with those paradoxes Aristotle loved. Remember the one about it’s being impossible to reach a goal? In order to reach a goal, one must first travel half the distance. But there are an infinite number of halves, so reaching a goal must be impossible. For Zeno of Elea, reality is reasoning, not the illusion the senses provide. [Read more]

Moses Maimonides

October 31, 2009

Moses Maimonides (1135-1204) was a great Spanish philosopher, an authority on Jewish oral laws, and a major intellectual figure of the Middle Ages. What Saint Augustine was to Christianity, Maimonides was to Judaism. So extensive was his influence that he has been called the Second Moses. [Read more]

Epicurus

October 31, 2009

Like Aristotle, Epicurus (341-270 BC) began a school without walls, where lessons were delivered in a more casual setting. [Read more]

Next Page »