New Lecture on Viktor Frankl

June 28, 2010

Let’s continue our introduction of existentialism with a look at Viktor Frankl. You don’t have to have been interned in a concentration camp (as Frankl was) to appreciate the importance of living each day as if it were your last. Although existentialism is known for its emphasis on anxiety, Frankl proposed that we are responsible for our attitudes, behaviors and reactions. Life may restrict you but we must give life meaning.

Here’s a video lecture on Viktor Frankl.

New Lecture on Rollo May

June 25, 2010

Dr. Ken Tangen introduces existentialism with a look at Rollo May. Although existentialism is known for its emphasis on anxiety, May offered a solution: love. Not the fluffy thinking of romantic love but the solid thoughtful love that shows care, concern and a willingness to be helpful.

Rollo May helped introduce existentialism to the United States. He was born in Ohio but was greatly influenced by European philosophers and theologians, particularly Paul Tillich. 

Here’s a look at Rollo May.

New Lecture on Rogers

June 4, 2010

Along with Maslow, Carl Rogers introduced humanism as a reaction to psychoanalysis and behaviorism. Rogers is the father of counseling psychology and co-father of humanism in psychology (with Maslow). Rogers put the focus on the person coming to counseling, not the therapist and his theories. This is real help for real people.

Take a look at the theory of Carl Rogers.

New Lecture on Maslow

June 2, 2010

Humanism was a major reaction to psychoanalysis and behaviorism. And Abraham Maslow was a leader in this 3rd Force of Psychology. People aren’t just bundles of unconscious processes or simply reacting to stimuli and rewards. We’re, for better and worse, human.

Here’s a new lecture on Maslow.